Welcome to the world of PixelatedArcade

A museum of vintage video games featuring photos, information, screenshots, artwork, and more.

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PixelatedArcade Site News

2021-12-20

Happy Holidays 2021!

The PixelatedArcade 2021 End of Year Roundup

It's hard to believe, but another year is just about wrapped up! That means it's time for another end-of-year roundup as seems to be the tradition - essentially just a quick note to say thanks for checking in and hope you enjoy seeing all of the vintage games, both the good and bad ones. Overall 2021 seems like it may have been a slow year for adding new games, scans, screenshots, and more to the site, but it's been busy nonetheless. A big chunk of time was taken up by my Silpheed project, an attempt to envision what that game might have looked like had there been an arcade version. Other cabinets and props were built along with that as well. It's not always immediately obvious, but several updates to the PixelatedArcade codebase were completed as well in order to improve features, resolve bugs, and to overall make administration of the site easier...
2021-12-03

Silpheed: The Arcade Game (Sort Of!)

Re-Imagining a Classic in a New Format and Behind the Scenes

Have you ever wondered what Silpheed might have looked like had there been an arcade version of it? Most likely the answer is no; Still, I thought why not find out? It seemed to me like a natural candidate; the gameplay is arcade-like, the controls are simple enough to be picked up quickly, unless you're good a game only takes a few minutes, and the game even as a demo resembling an arcade game's “attract mode”; not at all unlike many arcade shooters! So, I embarked on a project to not only imagine what such a beast might look like but to actually build a complete, actual size, playable cabinet. Here are some photos and an overview of the final results...

2021-10-24

Authentic, or Fake?

Identifying Big Box Computer Game Shrink-Wrap

Are you into collecting vintage computer games? If you're here, there's a good chance you are! As prices continue to rise for games that are still in their original shrink-wrap, being able to reasonably spot games that are, in fact, not in the original manufacturer's shrink-wrap and were done by the seller or someone else along the line can save you a lot of money and frustration. So, how can you tell? Fortunately, there are often signs to look for! Classic PC game guru Trixter has put together an incredible video explaining how. I highly recommend checking out his YouTube video Authentic, or fake? Identifying Big Box Computer Game Shrink-wrap to learn more. The information has been thoroughly researched and not only explains how to identify legitimate shrink-wrap but includes plenty of background and historical information as well; check out the video description which includes chapter stop details if you don't have time for the full video and want to jump around. This is yet another invaluable classic gaming resource following his IBM PCjr Print Media Archival Project.